Microsoft Windows Embedded Source Tools Reduce Bluetooth Development Time From Hours to Minutes

LAS VEGAS — May 10, 2005 – Today at Microsoft Mobile & Embedded DevCon 2005, Bill Gates, chairman and chief software architect of Microsoft Corp., announced the release of a free, managed-class library for building Bluetooth® enabled applications and services for Windows® CE- and Windows Mobile (TM) -based devices. The new library reduces the native Bluetooth code from hundreds of lines to just a few, making development faster and easier, and giving developers more time to create new and innovative applications. Offered under a Microsoft® Shared Source license, the Windows Embedded Source Tools for Bluetooth Technology enables developers to customize and ship their code without any obligation to share the modifications with Microsoft, competitors or the development community, giving developers the opportunity to differentiate their Bluetooth solutions in the marketplace.

“The traditionally time-intensive process for Bluetooth development just shrank considerably,” said Jane Gilson, director of the Mobile and Embedded Devices Division at Microsoft. “These source tools provide a unique solution, letting developers create Bluetooth applications in minutes instead of hours, all while expanding their Bluetooth offerings in this growing market.”

The range of Bluetooth enabled services and solutions that can now be created with the Windows Embedded Source Tools for Bluetooth Technology is limited only by the imaginations of the developers who use them. Scenarios could include connected devices such as those for peer-to-peer gaming, file transfer and social networking; mobile handsets and headsets; and the purchase of applications or services from mobile operator kiosks such as ring tones or themes, or even movies and games.

“I’ve done quite a bit of work with Bluetooth, and this announcement is really exciting,” said Doug Boling, author, public speaker and principal of Boling Consulting Inc. “Bluetooth coding to the native application program interface is extremely difficult, and having this source tool available will be very beneficial for the development community.”

The Windows Embedded Source Tools for Bluetooth Technology are available for Windows CE 5.0 and Windows Mobile 5.0 versions. The source tools are offered under a Shared Source license, making it free of charge and ensuring developers can integrate Microsoft’s Bluetooth enabled code into their own applications, while retaining all their own intellectual property. The source tools can be downloaded (connect-time charges may apply) from http://go.microsoft.com/?linkid=2955591.

About Windows CE and Windows Mobile Software

The Windows CE operating system is a set of off-the-shelf components enabling device-makers and developers to build powerful, 32-bit devices ranging from set-top boxes and voice over Internet protocol (VoIP)-enabled handhelds to gaming and medical devices. Windows Mobile software, developed on Windows CE, is a familiar and flexible software platform for partners to create mobile devices and applications for devices. More information on Windows CE can be found at http://msdn.microsoft.com/embedded/windowsce/default.aspx. More information about Windows Mobile can be found at http://www.microsoft.com/windowsmobile/default.mspx.

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Bluetooth is a trademark owned by the Bluetooth SIG Inc. and any use of such marks by Microsoft Corp. is under license.

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