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“The hotter the chile, the angrier the person. I’m hoping our chile turns out nice and mild today.”

Red chile is a staple for Adonis Trujillo and his community, especially for Feast Day. Join as he shares his family’s recipe, Taos Pueblo celebrations, and how he’s making an impact with Microsoft.

Feast Day red chile

Serves 10-15
2 lb. pork shoulder meat
3 Tbsp. minced garlic
1 c. ground red chile powder
1/2 c. flour
2 c. water
Pinch of garlic salt (optional)

Dice the pork into 1-in. square pieces. In a medium pot, add the pork, and then cover with water, about halfway full.

Heat the pot over medium-high heat, and boil the pork for about 50 minutes, or until it’s cooked and tender (not chewy). When it’s 3/4 of the way done, add the garlic.

In a mixing bowl, combine the red chile powder and the flour, and then slowly add the water to make a paste. Stir the paste with a wire whisk. Make sure not to make the paste too thick—you don’t want chunks of chile and flour in your chile.

Mix the paste into the pot with the pork, and continue to boil for about 30 minutes while stirring constantly. The red chile will look like soup when it’s done cooking.

If you want to add more flavor, add garlic salt to taste.

Serve warm, and enjoy with a piece of bread on the side.

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